Thursday, November 12, 2009

Cheryl, the Slow Learner--Part Three

On to the next part of my story. We've established that in my search for "My Passion," I learned that jewelry making was too hard on my hands and I moved on to carving and printing wood block prints. Somehow in my little brain I figured that carving wood blocks was easier on my hands. Yeah, I know--doesn't make much sense does it? But wait..it gets even BETTER!

As time went on, I let go of printing and slowly admitted that it probably wasn't a good idea for my hands. Besides, I didn't miss it. So my search went on. Then I stumbled upon Hitty. "Hitty--Her First Hundred Years" by Rachel Field has always been one of my girls' and my favorite books. It's a story about a 6 1/2 inch wooden doll's travels and adventures in the 1800s. Very charming. But what I didn't know was that there were all sorts of people who MADE her! Oh, that stirred the imagination of Ms. Do-it-herself!

Yes, you guessed it. "My Passion" took a turn from carving wood blocks to carving Hittys--wood-pegged joints and all. Yes, I hear you asking now, "How was carving little dolls easier than carving printing blocks?" It's a valid question. Well..I could tell you how pulling a carving knife towards oneself is easier than trying to precisely push and stop a carving knife through a block..and it would be true. But, PLEASE...WHAT was I thinking?! Carving is still hard on the hands. See what I mean about being a slow learner? By the time I had become rational again, I had already carved, sanded, painted, varnished, and clothed 2 little Hitty dolls and had started a third (now forever banished to a box in the basement).

I must admit that we had fun taking the Hittys on our own travels and adventures. Here's my first Hitty sitting at the base of a huge tree.

And here are my two Hittys sitting on the lawn of Monticello.
And at the Lincoln Memorial we have my two Hittys joined with a Hitty by Gail Wilson. My eldest daughter received it as a Christmas present during our "Hitty Fever." Gail creates beautiful Hittys from paper mache with cloth bodies. She sells all sorts of necessary supplies and kits for dolls and doll's furniture. I still love looking through her website, Gail Wilson Designs.
One or more Hittys still enjoy joining us on our travels--particularly when we are camping--we just have gotten more lazy about photographing them.

So, in my search for "My Passion" I never found it. I gladly put aside my carving knives because my hands hurt so much that I just couldn't ignore them any longer. And I gave up my search. Tomorrow I'll tell you about the conclusion. Although I'm sure you've already guessed that it has something to do with teddy bears!

Warmly,
Cheryl

5 comments:

  1. Oh wow, your little Hitty's are adorable! I LOVE the way they look!!!

    I've tried my hand at sculpting dolls from polymer clay, and that was hard enough, so I can't imagine carving one! I bow to you!!!!!

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  2. Thank you for sharing your story if Hitty. I am going to look that charming little book up so I can read it to my daughter! Your Hitty's were just fabulous! Just beautiful. I hope you hands find some relief for all your passions!
    Bear Hugs and Blessings,
    Tomi

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  3. A wonderful set of stories you have given us. I am enjoying your adventures through the world of handcrafts.

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  4. I love your Hitty dolls they are so beautiful. Gail Wilson has amazing vintage stuff and I have one of her kits still waiting to be made unfortunately. Oh for more hours in the day
    Wendy

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  5. Thank you all so much! I loved making the Hittys, but I look back now and am not sure how in the world I carved them. It must have been persistance--better known as stubborness.
    Warmly,
    Cheryl

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